GreatLakesWaterSafety

Making Waves & Working Together to End Drowning in the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium (GLWSC) is a “community of BEST practice" bringing together first responders, community leaders, park rangers, research scientists, lifeguards, meteorologists, survivors, loved ones, and other water safety advocates.

Our mission is to connect all groups and individuals interested in water safety to maximize our collective knowledge, resources, and actions to END DROWNING IN THE GREAT LAKES.

Hugh Jackman saves swimmers – are ocean rip currents more dangerous than Great Lakes rip currents?

March 28, 2016
For more information, contact:
Jamie Racklyeft, jracklye@gmail.com
734.358.8982

For immediate release

 

Hugh Jackman saves swimmers – are ocean rip currents more dangerous than Great Lakes rip currents?

Learn how to avoid, escape and safely save others at Great Lakes water safety conferences

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — As we heard the news of actor Hugh Jackman, aka “The Wolverine,” heroically saving swimmers in Sydney, Australia, the dangers of waves and currents in the Great Lakes are brought to light.

 

According to the Great Lakes Surf Rescue Project, the National Weather Service, and the Michigan Sea Grant, there have been nearly 450 drownings in the Great Lakes since 2010, with nearly 80 of them attributed to rip currents and structural currents, plus about 200 rescues.

 

“When a tragedy happens or when someone is rescued, we wonder how safe we really are when we head to the big lakes,” says Jamie Racklyeft, executive director of the Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium and rip current survivor. “The waves look like fun, but we need to understand that even an Olympic swimmer can’t overpower the currents waves can generate. Of course we need to know how to swim, but there is much more in keeping ourselves and our loved ones safe in the water, and these conferences have it all.”

 

The public is invited to learn about waves and currents from research scientists, first responders, and other lifesaving experts at two Great Lakes water safety conferences this spring, including how to avoid, escape, and safely save others. Hosted by the new Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium, there will be presenters representing the National Weather Service, Sea Grant Institute, Great Lakes Surf Rescue Project, research universities, local organizations, and popular vacation communities.

 

Cleveland 2016 Water Safety Conference:

April 19, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Lake Erie Nature & Science Center

28728 Wolf Road, Bay Village, OH

Register: https://glwsccleveland16.splashthat.com/

 

Grand Haven 2016 Water Safety Conference:

April 22, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Grand Haven Community Center

421 Columbus Avenue, Grand Haven, MI

Register: https://glwscgrandhaven16.splashthat.com/

 

Who Should Attend?

Everyone is welcome to attend and learn about ways to end drowning. Parents, community leaders, teachers, police, firefighters, EMTs, park rangers, the media – anyone who wants to learn to avoid, escape, and safely save others from waves and dangerous currents, and help spread water safety messages, including:

  • Stay dry when waves are high

  • When in doubt, don’t go out

  • Steer clear of the pier

  • Flip, float & follow

  • Drowning doesn’t look like drowning

 

Conference sessions will include waves & currents 101, a keynote address from a renowned water safety champion, interactive ideation sessions, media training, storytelling from survivors and victims’ loved ones, local perspectives, and more.

 

Visit GreatLakesWaterSafety.org for more information, for training referrals, or to join the Consortium for free.

 

ABOUT THE GLWSC
The mission of the Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium is to connect all groups and individuals interested in water safety to maximize our collective knowledge, resources, and actions to END DROWNING in the Great Lakes.

 

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